Home » Cantor Lectures on Recent American Methods and Appliances Employed in the Metallurgy of Copper, Lead, Gold, and Silver by James Douglas
Cantor Lectures on Recent American Methods and Appliances Employed in the Metallurgy of Copper, Lead, Gold, and Silver James  Douglas

Cantor Lectures on Recent American Methods and Appliances Employed in the Metallurgy of Copper, Lead, Gold, and Silver

James Douglas

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230284378
Paperback
32 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ... to become moreMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ... to become more distinctly so, as the manufacture of Montana coke increases and improves. Bessemer Smelting. The Bessemer plants of the Montana Works constitute their most distinctive feature, and are deserving of special study. The credit, not only of introducing M. Manhes modification of the steel converter to the exigencies of copper smelting, but of applying the process on a large scale, is due to Mr. Franklin Farrel, who, in 1882-3, erected two converters at the Parrot Works, in Butte. At first the operation of making bars consisted of two steps--blowing a 40 to 50 per cent. matte to a grade intermediate between blue and white metal, then casting, re-melting, and blowing this up to metallic copper. The difficulty of the process has always been met, whether by Hollway, or when the convertor was, very early in its history, used in Russia, as soon as metallic copper began to form and chill in the tuyeres. This obstacle M. Manhes combatted, by elevating the tuyeres, and inserting the blast through the side instead of the bottom of the converter. Ultimate success was achieved by so devising the tuyere boxes and tuyeres, that they could be readily reached, when necessary, and rapidly punched. Now the charge of matte is everywhere blown up to metal at one operation. The practice of the four Butte establisments, which convert, does not differ in essential particulars. All use upright converters, which remain stationary during the blow. The largest are those in the Boston and Montana works at Great Falls, which are an exact reproduction of the 15-ton steel convener, except that the tuyeres are elevated 18 inches above the bottom of the shell, so as to be on or above the level of the fresh lining. Three shells are the complement for each...